Welcome to the website of the 53rd PVI, Company C

The 53rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Inc. (53rd PVI) is a living history organization dedicated to the authentic portrayal of the common soldier of the Union (Federal) Army during the Civil War. We are based out of south-central Pennsylvania and are a member in good standing with The National Regiment. We emphasize historical research and authenticity, safety, company and battalion drill and battlefield tactics, seeking to educate the public about how the Federal Civil War soldier lived and fought. We dress in authentic uniforms and use authentic (yet reproduction) equipment, carry reproduction weapons, and camp in authentic tents. We regularly meet for battle reenactments, parades, school events, and living history events throughout the year.

During most of the Civil War, the 53rd PVI was part of the 2nd Army Corps (Army of The Potomac) and the 2nd Corps’ motto was: “Clubs Are Trumps!”

We generally use Casey’s 1862 Infantry Tactics: Casey’s vol.1 and Casey’s vol.2
(thank you to our friends at the 64th Illinois, Co. E for sharing these files)

53rd PVI, Company C at Gruber Wagon Works (Reading, PA) July 2016 (Courtesy of Eric Ford)

tintype photo1

Tintype of some of the men of the 53rd PVI, Company C with our colors (2016). Courtesy of www.mototintype.com. Included are (L to R): Sgt. Marc Benedict, Corporal Matthew Steger, Private Joseph Marks, Private John Rentschler, Private Jeff Marks, Private Doug Raab, Private Steve Dillon, and Sgt. Mark Fasnacht.

Company C, 95th Pennsylvania Infantry

6corpsbadgeWe also portray Company C, 95th Pennsylvania Infantry (“Gosline’s Zouaves”) at events where the 95th PVI saw service. Visit our historical and informational pages on the 95th Pennsylvania Infantry, 1861-1865 by clicking here.

Remembering Our Pard

John P. Lowry, 63, of Denver, passed away on Saturday, July 9, 2016, at Hershey Medical Center. He was born in Lancaster County to the late Dean and Joanna W. (Bigler) Lowry and was the loving husband and best friend of Sherry (Swarmer) Lowry, with whom he shared 15 years of companionship and 10 years of marriage.

John was a loving and involved husband, father and grandfather who instilled a love of life, learning and hard work in his children and grandchildren. He was a history buff and a Civil War re-enactor with the 53rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Company C. He was a musician, playing bass guitar and piano, a handyman, and enjoyed traveling, riverboat cruises, and spending time with his family. John was a 1971 graduate of Hempfield H.S. He was a letter carrier with the USPS in the Ephrata area, having retired after 30 years of service. He was most recently a delivery person for the West Side Radiator Shop in Stevens.

John’s smile, sense of humor and compassion are missed by all who were lucky enough to know him!

Honoring Our Civil War Dead
Reburial at FIG


On Wednesday 16 November 2016, a few members of the 53rd PVI were honored to be able to participate in a re-burial ceremony at Ft. Indiantown Gap National Cemetery of 3 black Federal Civil War soldiers. One was a member of the 54th Massachusetts (the famed “Glory” regiment). A second was in the Massachusetts Cavalry. Little is known of the 3rd solder. Each had originally been interred in Cumberland County, PA in the 1880s, however these graves were recently disinterred since they were now on a modern residential property.

Modern Civil War re-enactors being able to participate in the burial of original Civil War veterans is an extremely rare occasion and quite an honor. A burial ceremony with full military honors was bestowed to these heroes at Ft. Indiantown Gap Cemetery. We served as the Civil War honor/color guard for this ceremony. Participating in the ceremony were [see 1st photo]: (standing left to right) Private Steve Dillon, Corporal Matthew Steger, Private Eric Ford. Photos are courtesy of Pat Rose.

The Monument of the 53rd PVI at GettysburgFull 53rd PVI Monument

The monument of the 53rd PVI at Gettysburg NMP is located on Brooke Avenue near the Rose Farm. It was dedicated on Pennsylvania Day in 1889. It is located (coordinates): 39.7951° N, 77.2470° W. It was designed by A. Wagner (sculptor) and manufactured by Henry-Bonnard Bronze Company and Oursler & Sons.